Using the earth for radiometric dating Free webcam no credit card notoken

My purpose here is not to review and discuss all of the dating methods in use.

Instead, I describe briefly only the three principal methods. These are the three methods most commonly used by scientists to determine the ages of rocks because they have the broadest range of applicability and are highly reliable when properly used.

There are a number of long-lived radioactive isotopes used in radiometric dating, and a variety of ways they are used to determine the ages of rocks, minerals, and organic materials.

Some of the isotopic parents, end-product daughters, and half-lives involved are listed in Table 1.

The point is that not all methods are applicable to all rocks of all ages.

One of the primary functions of the dating specialist (sometimes called a geochronologist) is to select the applicable method for the particular problem to be solved, and to design the experiment in such a way that there will be checks on the reliability of the results.

They observed that every rock formation, no matter how ancient, appeared to be formed from still older rocks.

By the mid- to late 1800s, geologists, physicists, and chemists were searching for ways to quantify the age of the Earth.

The K-Ar clock works primarily on igneous rocks, i.e., those that form from a rock liquid (such as lava and granite) and have simple post-formation histories.

It does not work well on sedimentary rocks because these rocks are composed of debris from older rocks.

Second, the rock or mineral must not lose or gain either potassium or argon from the time of its formation to the time of analysis.

By many experiments over the past three decades, geologists have learned which types of rocks and minerals meet these requirements and which do not.

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