Dating rs germany marks

There are brief descriptions of different types of hallmarks that you are likely to find in a watch case, and then for the British and Swiss hallmarks there are links to take you to pages of more detailed information.

If you want to get a book about British hallmarking, Bradbury's Book of Hallmarks published by the Sheffield Assay Office is a long established reference.

From 1 June 1907 the assay offices were ordered to strike hallmarks on imported watch cases that were different from those struck on watch cases made in the UK.

For instance the London Assay Office town mark for watch cases manufactured in Britain was a leopard's head, but the town mark used on imported watches became the zodiac symbol Leo on a crossed back ground in an oval shield.

Precious metal (gold and silver, and more recently platinum) objects have by law been tested and marked in England since at least the year 1300, and since 1478 had to be taken to Goldsmiths' Hall in London, from which the term ‘hallmarking’ originate.

In 1478 the first permanent assayer was appointed and items had to be taken to Goldsmiths' Hall to be assayed and marked, the origin of the term "hallmarking".

A system of variable letters, changed each year when new wardens were elected, was introduced to identify when, and therefore by whom, an item had been assayed.

In addition to the fineness, hallmarks can show where and when an item was hallmarked, and under whose name it was submitted.

This page helps you to make a start on identifying the hallmarks in your watch case, and then leads you to another page with more detail.

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