Dating old ball jars brazillian dating

Rumors have circulated for years (and have especially been promoted on auction sites and by flea market and antique mall dealers) that superstitious distillers of illegal whiskey (“moonshiners”) who often use fruit jars to contain their product, were hesitant to use jars marked with a 13 on the bottom.

According to the stories, they threw them away, or intentionally broke them, fearing their enterprise could otherwise be met with bad luck.

somewhat akin to the practice of collecting coins and comparing their minor “mold” or “die” variations.

section farther down on this page, and read the queries from Lee and Michelle, posted November / December of 2015. The great majority of these jars were made in bluish-aqua or “Ball Blue” colored glass (Ball Blue is the standard color of these jars, a somewhat “more blue” shade of aqua).

On some jar variants, (such as the first BALL embossing variant on these jars, “Logo 5” in chart shown below, used circa 1913-1923 on BPM jars), the number be accompanied by a letter to the right, such as A or C.

As can be readily discovered, there were many different “sets” of molds used over a period of many years, with this same series of (up to) 16 numbers used over and over again to identify the molds being used on a particular machine.

GLASS FACTORY INFO ~ Dating ~ Antique Bottles ~ Fruit Jars ~ Glass Electrical Insulators ~ Tableware ~ Articles about different kinds of Glassware ~ Manufacturers' Marks used by Glass Companies in the United States The Ball Perfect Mason was a brand of glass fruit jar (canning jar) made by the Ball Bros. Glass jars with this embossed marking was almost certainly the most popular jar for home canning ever produced in the United States.

They are commonly seen for sale on the secondary market at antique malls, farm auctions, flea markets, yard sales, and on online auction sites.

Ball Perfect Mason jars were made utilizing steel molds as part of “ABM” (“Automatic Bottle Machine”) i.e. Many different jar molds (thousands) were used over the many years’ time these jars were being produced.

Each mold was hand-cut (hand-engraved) with the lettering incised backward into the inside surface of the mold, which of course resulted in the embossing (raised lettering) which is seen on the surface of the jar.

The underline may be very long, or heavily “looped”.

Most of the typical Ball Perfect Mason’s are marked with a mold number between 0 and 15 on the bottom.

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